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Jails Deserve Justice

Sara Wolovick returns to the ACLU of Utah for a two-year fellowship focused on jail reforms.\

Who says you can’t go back?

When Sara Wolovick left the ACLU of Utah in 2017 at the end of a summer legal internship, she returned to Georgetown Law School to finish her degree. And now, as a newly minted J.D., Sara is returning to the ACLU as an Equal Justice Works Fellow to address the injustices and abuses within Utah’s jail and prison system that she researched as an intern.

SaraWolovick 400Sara’s two-year fellowship is funded by an anonymous donor, giving our organization increased capacity to address the many challenges facing Utah’s county jails, which led the nation in per-capita inmate deaths in recent years. Plus, with the likely release of Davis County’s jail standards, inspection reports, and audits (following a protracted public records and legal challenge by the ACLU of Utah and others) Sara is arriving at just the right time to make a difference. 

“I went to law school because I wanted to be better equipped to advocate for social justice and human dignity,” Sara said. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to contribute to an organization like the ACLU of Utah that works to protect and advance those interests through civil rights work.”

Another bonus is Sara’s law school experience working at the Georgetown Center on Privacy and Technology, a key partner currently helping us identify the rapid spread of surveillance technology across Utah that threatens our right to privacy (see page 6). Outside of her legal work, Sara appreciates art, both wandering through local museums and creating her own using watercolors and ceramics. 

As she begins her new (but familiar) role at the ACLU of Utah, Sara looks forward to meeting community partners, diving into the jail standards and reports, and working to protect the civil rights of people held in Utah’s jails and prisons.

…from the Fall 2019 Liberty Reporter